The Benefits of a Roommate

In previous articles, I have pointed out that Americans have more space than they had 100 years ago. I have also pointed out that this space tends to cost more in terms of taxes, upkeep, and utility costs. Besides living in a smaller space, what can one do to leverage the space that one has currently?

May I suggest the benefits of having a roommate or renting out a room as a possible alternative? Often I will hear people say that they would like to be able to have a rental, and yet question when I suggest starting by letting out a spare bedroom. Sometimes they may point out that this is for when family/friends come to visit. Or they may say that they value their privacy and do not want anyone else sharing a space with them.

Let us take a look at some of the financial implications of being able to rent out a room for $450/month. Let us assume that you have a vacancy rate of 10% or that it takes a little more than a month to find a roommate. Let us also assume that due to various reasons that it costs $600/year to have the roommate in terms of upkeep costs, etc. Doing the math in this situation we would come up with an additional $4,260 in income.

If we were to have multiple rooms available to let, this figure could be increased accordingly. It is acknowledged that this amount could vary depending on the room in question.

What could you do with an extra $4,000+/year in income? What if you were to have this extra amount set aside for four or five years?  Would you then potentially be able to purchase a small rental unit of your own, or at the very least be in a position where the possibility is much more feasible?

For some people, the cost of loss of privacy is not worth it. I understand this. For those that do not mind, there may be some opportunity to be had in terms of improved cash flow and potential investment savings.

Let us take a look at the long term effects of having a roommate as described in our hypothetical example if you were able increase your rent by 3% per year and what would happen if you were able to get 3%, 5%, and 7% returns on your money respectively.

As you can see, we are talking about an opportunity cost that could be equal to several hundred thousand dollars over the course of 30 years. Now granted, this amount could vary based on returns and your tax rate. However, given the amount of money that is at stake, it behooves the question for many Americans, how much is your privacy really worth?

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